Posts by lalh

VIEW, Summer 2004, Number 4

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

VIEW, Summer 2004, Number 4 A few highlights: • A featured story about Catherine Howett’s forthcoming monograph on the country estate and village of Reynolda, in WInston-Salem, North Carolina, looks at the conjunction of landscape design and the new southern woman in the person of the feisty and imaginative Katherine Reynolds, wife of the famed […]

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VIEW, Summer 2005, Number 5

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

VIEW, Summer 2005, Number 5 A few highlights: • Read a feature on a new LALH book about Henry Shaw, a Victorian gentleman who created a world-famous botanical garden in St. Louis in the mid-nineteenth century and then turned his horticultural skills (and his fortune) to making Tower Grove Park. Carol Grove’s fascinating text is […]

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VIEW, Summer 2006, Number 6

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

VIEW, Summer 2006, Number 6 A few highlights: • Read about a forthcoming book from LALH, a new edition of Blanche M. G. Linden’s classic, Silent City on a Hill—the story of Mount Auburn Cemetery, the first rural cemetery in America—revised, expanded, re-designed and printed in large format. • Jane Roy Brown writes about recent […]

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VIEW, Summer 2007, Number 7

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

VIEW, Summer 2007, Number 7 A few highlights: • Lead stories in this issue describe Ethan Carr’s new book Mission 66 and our reprint of Frank Waugh’s Book of Landscape Gardening. • Carr also contributes a thought-provoking essay about recent developments at the National Park Service and what we’ve learned in the years since Mission […]

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VIEW, Summer 2008, Number 8

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

VIEW, Summer 2008, Number 8 A few highlights: Robin Karson writes about her new book: A Genius for Place, focusing on the imaginative response to place that characterizes each of the designs featured in the book. Patricia O’Donnell, of Heritage Landscapes in Charlotte, Vermont, addresses the topic of preserving country estates from the practitioner’s point […]

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Naumkeag

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

Naumkeag Stockbridge, Massachusetts Fletcher Steele (1885–1971) founded his Boston-based practice in 1913 after a five-year apprenticeship with Warren Manning and became one of the most experimental landscape architects of the period. Throughout his career, Steele viewed plants unsentimentally, as abstract color and form. When he met Mabel Choate in 1925, Steele was at the height of […]

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Val Verde

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

Val Verde Santa Barbara, California When Lockwood de Forest (1896–1949) returned from his honeymoon in 1925, he found Wright Ludington waiting on his front porch. Ludington’s father had just purchased Val Verde, a beautiful Montecito estate, and the shy, melancholic artist wanted de Forest to get to work on a new landscape plan immediately. The […]

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Ford House

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

Edsel and Eleanor Ford House Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan Danish-born Jens Jensen (1860–1951) studied at Tune Agricultural School, outside Copenhagen, and in 1884 emigrated to the United States. He found a job as a laborer for the Chicago West Parks, where he created the “American Garden,” a unique prairie wildflower garden that revealed the beauties […]

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Dumbarton Oaks

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

Dumbarton Oaks Washington, D.C. When Mildred and Robert Woods Bliss commissioned Beatrix Jones Farrand (1872–1959) to design a garden for their new fifty-four-acre Georgetown property, Farrand was one of the country’s most acclaimed landscape architects—Mrs. Woodrow Wilson and Princeton University figured among her prominent clients. Farrand’s diverse training included a horticultural apprenticeship with Charles Sprague […]

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Winterthur

Thursday, March 1, 2012 | Posted by

Winterthur Winterthur, Delaware Henry Francis du Pont (1880–1969) and Marian Cruger Coffin (1876–1957) began a lifelong friendship while du Pont was studying horticulture at Harvard’s Bussey Institution and Coffin was pursuing a degree in landscape architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the only professional program open to women at the time. Years later, when du […]

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